Archive for January, 2010

Developing Strategies for Training and Development

Sunday, January 24th, 2010

Most learning organizations establish a strategic plan, often yearly, that addresses the objectives to support the organization in achieving its goals over the plan’s period.  Training is a Learning and Development function that supports the organization’s strategic objectives by filling the gaps in skills and knowledge required to achieve those objectives.  In order to do this effectively, we must first identify those gaps and then establish an operational strategy that aligns with the organization’s overall strategy.  Let’s examine some of the steps common to this process.

  1. Assess what level of performance will be required to assist the organization in achieving its goals.  What skills or enhancement will we need to implement the organization’s strategic plan? For example, if the strategic plan calls for a reduction in the cost of the products we manufacture to better compete in the market, we would want to determine if our supply management team has the necessary ability to negotiate better pricing with existing suppliers or find new ones. An assessment would be our first objective.
  2. Determine where gaps currently exist between the existing performance and the required performance.  Here we want to assess the skills and performance that we currently have against what we have established as required to accomplish the levels of performance needed by the organization. Benchmarking and determining best practices would be our second objective.
  3. Establish a strategy to meet current and future needs. The challenge, then, is to determine how we are going to go from where we are currently to where we need to be at some future point. There are several possible strategies to consider:
    1. i.      Provide in-house, specialized training to the supply management group by hiring instructors who are experts in the subject matter. This training will be tailored to our precise needs. Since the training will be conducted at the organization’s facilities, no travel is required. Very little cross-pollination of ideas will take place considering all the trainees will be from the same organization.
    2. ii.      Locate educational resources with existing training programs in the subjects.  This training will address the common needs of the mixed group. Staff can attend at several specific times during a period but will likely have to travel.
    3. iii.      Develop an eLearning program for both self-study and instructor-led online training (blended learning). This training, too, can be tailored to our exact needs; however, it is delivered through a Learning Management System that can be accessed by the trainee at any time. (To better  understand the capabilities of this method, browse through the eLeaP website at www.eleapsoftware.com)

Download the complete white paper and get access to free training resources including: White Papers, Reports, & articles at http://www.eleapsoftware.com/free-training-resources/

The Strategic Value of Workplace Training and Development

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

Training can be defined as the process of teaching or learning a skill. That’s the textbook definition. But in reality, the concept of training has many more aspects than just learning a skill. To many organizations, training is a means of meeting regulatory or legal requirements. Common to this purpose, for example, is training employees in the rules of sexual harassment in the workplace. There are other examples, as well: Safety Training for employees working with industrial equipment to meet insurance requirements or training in the organization’s policy and procedures. There is management training, too. One of the programs we see quite frequently is Training for New Supervisors.

There’s no argument that compliance or certification training is very important…to the organization, to the individual, or both. But the questions that we hear again and again is this: “How does training add value to my organization? “Why should training and professional development be a part of our strategy?” “Where, exactly, is the return on the investment?”

Telania | eLeaP presents this free research white paper on “The Strategic Value of Workplace Training and Development”.  In this white paper, we examine the intended purpose of training including productivity, quality, empowerment, alignment, teamwork and, importantly, professional development.  We also examine how training supports reductions in liability and risk, and can be used to communicate business conduct and social responsibility requirements for the organization.

We then moved the discussion to ways of calculating value and increasing value through eLearning.  We followed this with a detailed look at developing strategies for training and development, along with some additional considerations in the development of training strategy.  We conclude this in-depth analysis with a section on how training can be used to empower employees.

Here’s what you’ll find covered in this White Paper:

* How does Training add Value to your Organization?

* Why should Training and Professional Development be part of your Strategy?

* Where, exactly, is the Return on your Investment and how do you Measure it?

* How to Increase Value Through eLearning

* How to Develop Strategies for Training and Development

To download this valuable research White Paper, go to http://www.eleapsoftware.com/free-training-resources/strategic-value-of-workplace-training-whitepaper/